Amorim TopSeries “Whitetop” stopper seals award-winning Windspiel Premium Dry Gin

2016-09-30


Windspiel Premium Dry Gin - that was recently awarded a "Special Mention" in the Excellent Communications Design category of the German Design Awards - is sealed with Top Series’ pioneering "Whitetop" stopper, a capsulated cork stopper specifically designed for white spirits.

Amorim Top Series, part of the Amorim Group, the world’s leader in the production of natural bottle closures, commercializes an exclusive range of capsulated cork stoppers for the world’s most celebrated spirit brands.  

Over recent years the Company has been expanding its presence in the White Spirits sector.
Following a major research programme based on advanced technology and rigorous testing, Amorim Top Series has recently unveiled the Whitetop stopper - a premium cork closure solution designed for white spirits.

Laboratory validation tests confirm that Whitetop stoppers deliver excellent performance when used with white spirits, in key parameters such as colour migration, dust migration and sensorial neutrality.

Whitetop corks thus offer a new world of possibilities for natural cork, adding value to both the products and market recognition, since the new corks guarantee the integrity of Client’s products at all levels - from visual to organoleptic performance.
Windspiel Gin’s core concepts of sustainability, clarity and elegance made natural cork the obvious choice to seal the dry gin - which uses raw alcohol produced from potatoes which the owners grow on their farm in the Volcanic Eifel.

Dennis Lönnendonker, Authorized Signatory at Windspiel explains that she chose Whitetop because the company wanted a sustainable and unpretentious design, that would be simultaneously "stylish and attractive. So we conveyed this idea in the details such as the cord on the cork, the golden ring and the little flag."
Windspiel’s cork stopper is rounded off by a small flag with royal character that refers to the origin of the brand name, given that it was Frederick the Great who discovered the potato in Germany and his second great passion was greyhounds, or in German "Windspiel".